Friends Of Ye Olde Towne Hall

Calendar of Events

Event List Calendar

July 29, 2019


Summer camp ages 9 to 12

Summer arts and crafts camp for older kids.  Come and enjoy the fun that Shae-Lyn and the volunteers have planned for you.  Registration starts now.  Fee is $100.00.

Please contact Shae-Lyn at:  ailsacraigsummercamp@gmail.com  Time is 9 am to 4 pm all days.

Start: July 29, 2019

July 22, 2019


Summer Camps ages 4 to 8

We are going to offer summer camps again this year, the only criteria is that you like to have fun and experience some of the arts.   Ages 4 to 8  July 22 to July 26.  Registration starts now. Fee $100.00 per child.  Please contact Shae-Lyn at:  ailsacraigsummercamp@gmail.com                                           Time is 9 am to 4 pm all days.

Start: July 22, 2019

June 7, 2019


Valdy up close and personal

We are pleased to announce the live performance of  Valdy, Canada’s Troubadour Up Close and Personal, at Ye Olde Towne Hall on Friday, June 7, 2019.  “Sing Me A Rock and Roll Song” is just the tip of the iceberg of his amazing repertoire.  Enjoy an evening with this man who is a genuine icon of Canada’s folk music scene.  Tickets are $25.00 in advance and 30.00 at the door

Start: June 7, 2019 7:30 pm
Tickets: 25.00
Purchase Tickets

April 17, 2019


General Meeting

Notice of Annual General Meeting – 2017-18

Take notice that the Annual Meeting of the Members of the
FRIENDS OF YE OLDE TOWNE HALL
will be held as follows:

DATE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 2019
TIME: 7:00pm TO 9:00 pm. EDT
LOCATION: Ye Olde Towne Hall
160 Main Street, Ailsa Craig ON

The purpose of the meeting is to:

  1. approve the minutes of the 2016/2017 Annual General Meeting;
  2. receive the Audited Financial Statements for 2017/2018;
  3. appoint the Auditors for 2018/2019
  4. elect Directors;
  5. transact such other business as may properly come before the meeting.

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD
Marilyn Barbe
Secretary

Start: April 17, 2019 7:00 pm

April 6, 2019


Mudmen: Celtic Rock Warriors

Legion Bar Service.  Always entertaining and definitely unique, The Mudmen are a blast of Celtic energy whose members are known to be characters both on and off the stage. First discovered in 1993 as “The Campbell Brothers”, the band signed a deal with EMI Records and changed their name to “Mudmen” in 1998. Their music has been featured on Xbox and PlayStation games, NBC’s television show “Black Donnellys”, WWE Wrestling, Don Cherry’s  9, 19, 20, 21, 24, 27,29 hockey videos, The Mackenzie Brothers TWO-FOUR Special on CBC, HBO’S Shameless TV show, HNIC Coach’s Corner (Dale Hunter tribute), 6 music videos on Much Music, and they’ve reached top 20 on the Edge radio.

With nearly 3000 shows to date, The Mudmen Robby Campbell, Sandy Campbell, Jeremy Burton, Mike Meacher and Dan Westenenk believe that nice guys can finish first. While enjoying life & what you do translates to all audiences.

The Mudmen are building a legion of fans from young to old with career highlights such as 12 Canada Walk of Fame Ceremonies, the Leaf & Bruins Game at The ACC, opening performance for ZZ Top & The Guess Who,  over 40 cross Canada Tours, festival dates in America & Europe and a performance at TSN’s “For the Love of The Game” Canadian gold ring presentation with Sidney Crosby.

Start: April 6, 2019

March 26, 2019


Craigactive Quilts of New Zealand Trunk Show

A CraigActive event.  Join us for a soup and sandwich lunch.  We start gathering around 11:30 am for coffee and social time.  Lunch (pay what you can, suggested price is $6.00) is served at noon followed by an interesting program

Quilting in New Zealand was not a craft widely practised until the recent worldwide “explosion” in the 1970s.  Some early quilts are known in both New Zealand and Australia, having been brought from Great Britain, and some early “waggas” (haps, rough quilts) and other quilts were made there. As New Zealand has mostly a temperate climate, quilts were not as necessary for warmth as in parts of Canada. Also, sheep have been a mainstay there for both wool and meat from very early on so wool was being spun for clothing and covering from early days.

Since the quilt revolution of recent years, the number of quilters has multiplied. The October 1996 issue of “New Zealand Quilter” listed membership in the 110 or so groups and guilds throughout the country at 4100+. Although there is no doubt some duplication in listed membership, there are probably at least another 2-3000 quilters who do not belong to listed groups.

Guilds in New Zealand are similar to those all over the world. There are large ones and small ones. The large ones tend to have more formal programmes and structure. The small groups usually have a less formal structure and perhaps fewer outside speakers or programmes, as everywhere because of monetary constraints. Small groups often form within a large guild and offer more intimate settings for friendship. Most of the groups of any size hold displays or exhibitions, some yearly, some biennially, some on a less regular basis. The larger groups tend to have more classes and hold “open days” and retreats. The smaller groups meet more frequently, usually in members’ homes.

New Zealand quilters have had biennial symposia since late 1984. The first one was held in Auckland, in the North Island, in December 1984, the second in Christchurch, in the South Island, in February 1987 and they have alternated between the north and south Islands every odd-numbered year since.

Until 1994 there was no National Organisation in New Zealand and symposia were, and still are, run by either one or a group of guilds in an area. The locality decision seems to be arranged by “gentleman’s agreement” and this works very well.

Symposia also have lectures by overseas and local quilters, various exhibitions, including a “suitcase” exhibition which tours for up to a year after the event, a merchants’ mall, and other attractions which tend to be different with each one. They are high points in the lives of New Zealand quilters and often the saving for the next begins with the arrival home from the most recent!

Start: March 26, 2019 11:30 am

March 12, 2019


Craigactive movie

A CraigActive event.  Join us for a soup and sandwich lunch.  We start gathering around 11:30 am for coffee and social time.  Lunch (pay what you can, suggested price is $6.00) is served at noon followed by an interesting movie.  This week you can choose between Lala Land and Victoria and Abdul

Victoria and Abdul was nominated for 2 academy awards:  Queen Victoria strikes up an unlikely friendship with a young Indian clerk named Abdul Karim

La La Land:   While navigating their careers in Los Angeles, a pianist and an actress fall in love while attempting to reconcile their aspirations for the future.

Start: March 12, 2019 11:30 am

March 9, 2019


Rant Maggie Rant

Join us for a performance by Stratford’s own Rant Maggie Rant.  These Aeolian Hall regulars are pleased to perform here on Saturday, March 9, at 8:00 pm.  Legion Bar service. Ticket Price: $20.00 in advance and $22.00 at the door.   While Rant Maggie Rant sticks close to the musical roots of Ireland and Scotland, as well as the other 5 Celtic nations and Canada’s East Coast traditions, these melodies are usually supported by the band’s unique fusion of hand-drumming, dub/jazz bass, soaring vocals, harmonies and folk/blues/rock guitar. Led by fiddler Lindsay Schindler, the band is supported by centre stage vocalist Glen Dias, who also plays recorder and percussion, Barry James Payne on guitars/bouzouki, Daev Clysdale on whistles and accordion, Rob Larose on percussion and Steve Clark on bass.

In September, the band released its third CD, a self-titled effort that was recorded at its sold-out performance at the highly regarded Hugh’s Room in Toronto on St. Patrick’s Day, unbeknownst to the musicians and the crowd.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtiFB0eRANU

Start: March 9, 2019 8:00 pm
Tickets: 20.00
Purchase Tickets

February 26, 2019


CRAIGACTIVE Slave Chapel Lecture

A CraigActive event.  Join us for a soup and sandwich lunch.  We start gathering around 11:30 am for coffee and social time.  Lunch (pay what you can, suggested price is $6.00) is served at noon followed by an interesting program led by Genet Hodder who was on the board dedicated to rescuing the Fugitive Slave Chapel which was a part that London played on the Underground Railroad.

More about the chapel as quoted in an article from 1926: ”

In what is the oldest district of London, in a place which in the early years of the last century was thoughtlessly and unfairly referred to as Nigger Hollow, from the fact that many colored people had made their homes there, stands a house known as No. 275 Thames street, which is hallowed with memories. It was the original African Methodist Episcopal Church — made over into a dwelling when the colored congregation improved its social and financial position, and they abandoned the old edifice to occupy the then new and handsome structure known as the British Methodist Episcopal Bethemanuel Church on Grey street, between Colborne and Maitland streets.

For many years it had been accepted that the original African Methodist Fugitive Slave Chapel of London had been torn down, but the writer was able, with the assistance of some old-timers, including Mrs. Robert Mawhinney, whose husband was for many years janitor of the city hall, and who previous to that appointment had been a policeman in London. Her nephew, Mr. Bradley, also assisted in the identification.

To Mr. R. H. Dignan, city registrar, the writer is also indebted for the tracing of the property back to the deed from the crown. The records in Mr. Dignan’s office show that William Clark, a carpenter, secured the original deed for a lot, 30 feet frontage by 110 feet deep, on Sept. 8, 1847, and that a month later, on Oct. 14, 1847, he “gave, granted, bargained, sold, released, confirmed and conveyed” this lot, comprising 3,300 square feet, for the sum of £ 22 10s, to the following, in trust for the African Methodist Episcopal Church: William Hamilton, Benjamin Harris, John Osburne, Henry James, Henry Logan, Thomas Wingate and George Winemiller”

Start: February 26, 2019 11:30 am

January 23, 2019


Craigactive New Zealand Quilt Trunk show

CraigActive for active retirees is held on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month from September to May.  Join us at 11:30 am for coffee and social time.  A soup and sandwich lunch (pay what you can, suggested donation is $6.00) is served at noon.  Program begins at 1:00 pm. The trunk show is our chance to learn more about New Zealand and the upcoming quilt festival and the Fiber art Challenge which is new this year.

Each year the tiny village of Ailsa Craig, Ontario hosts an internationally recognized Quilt Festival. The Festival is run by local volunteers and features displays, classes, the gourmet Quilt Café, vendors and demonstrations. Past countries hosted include Russia, Ireland, Great Britain, Africa, France, Israel, Denmark, Holland, Latvia an Iceland. In 2017 the Festival hosted Canada 150 to celebrate Canada’s sesquicentennial. In 2019 we welcome New Zealand! We hope you join us from May 20th-25th and don’t forget to say “Kia Ora” as you join in the fun!

Quilting in New Zealand was not a craft widely practised until the recent worldwide “explosion” in the 1970s.  Some early quilts are known in both New Zealand and Australia, having been brought from Great Britain, and some early “waggas” (haps, rough quilts) and other quilts were made there. As New Zealand has mostly a temperate climate, quilts were not as necessary for warmth as in parts of Canada. Also, sheep have been a mainstay there for both wool and meat from very early on so wool was being spun for clothing and covering from early days.

Since the quilt revolution of recent years, the number of quilters has multiplied. The October 1996 issue of “New Zealand Quilter” listed membership in the 110 or so groups and guilds throughout the country at 4100+. Although there is no doubt some duplication in listed membership, there are probably at least another 2-3000 quilters who do not belong to listed groups.

Guilds in New Zealand are similar to those all over the world. There are large ones and small ones. The large ones tend to have more formal programmes and structure. The small groups usually have a less formal structure and perhaps fewer outside speakers or programmes, as everywhere because of monetary constraints. Small groups often form within a large guild and offer more intimate settings for friendship. Most of the groups of any size hold displays or exhibitions, some yearly, some biennially, some on a less regular basis. The larger groups tend to have more classes and hold “open days” and retreats. The smaller groups meet more frequently, usually in members’ homes.

New Zealand quilters have had biennial symposia since late 1984. The first one was held in Auckland, in the North Island, in December 1984, the second in Christchurch, in the South Island, in February 1987 and they have alternated between the north and south Islands every odd-numbered year since.

Until 1994 there was no National Organisation in New Zealand and symposia were, and still are, run by either one or a group of guilds in an area. The locality decision seems to be arranged by “gentleman’s agreement” and this works very well.

Symposia also have lectures by overseas and local quilters, various exhibitions, including a “suitcase” exhibition which tours for up to a year after the event, a merchants’ mall, and other attractions which tend to be different with each one. They are high points in the lives of New Zealand quilters and often the saving for the next begins with the arrival home from the most recent!

Start: January 23, 2019 11:30 am
Tickets: 6.00